Ministry Miseries or Pastoral Pleasures

Why are so many pastors portraying themselves and their ministries in as negative a light as they possibly can?

A La Carte (12/6)

The Royal Fetus – Denny Burk asks an insightful question: With all this coverage, I just have one question. Why is it that I have yet to hear or read anyone refer to her unborn child as the “royal fetus”? Oh, I’m sure someone has used the term “fetus,” but it seems to me that the preferred term is “royal baby” or “child,” even though the Duchess of Cambridge is in the very early stages of pregnancy.

Rick Warren’s ResurrectionNewsweek has an article about Rick Warren and how he is attempting to return to the spotlight. It’s not an awfully well-written article, but it’s interesting all the same.

Sexual Freedom – Trevin Wax says that sexual freedom always curtails other freedoms. “There is no such thing as absolute freedom when it comes to sexuality. The moment we celebrate or endorse certain behaviors, we curtail freedom in other areas. This is the nature of freedom.”

Jason Meyer – An article at Desiring God introduces Jason Meyer, the pastor who will take over at Bethlehem Baptist Church when John Piper steps aside.

The Counter-Intuitive Calvin – Reading this article by Tim Keller—an article in which he reflects on what he’s learned from reading Calvin’s Institutes—will probably make you want to read Calvin as well.

Getting Better and Preaching – Mark Driscoll provides a really helpful response to someone who asked him how he can be a better preacher.

Genius: The Movie – Ray Comfort has just released a new film called Genius that is free online. Love him or hate him, it’s probably worth the half-hour investment.

If truth were told, most of us spend longer each day on personal cleanliness than on practical godliness. —Alistair Begg

Advertise here via BEACON

Check out

Rejection and creativity, Tough love email, Muslim testimony, Sermon Intros, Sabbaths and children

Worthy Eating and Drinking

Here’s an excerpt from Worthy Eating and Drinking, Iain Campbell’s contribution to the December issue of Tabletalk.
One of our Scottish preachers used to say that the believer has three looks at the Lord’s Table. There is, first, a retrospective look. …

Worthy Eating and Drinking

Here’s an excerpt from Worthy Eating and Drinking, Iain Campbell’s contribution to the December issue of Tabletalk.
One of our Scottish preachers used to say that the believer has three looks at the Lord’s Table. There is, first, a retrospective look. …

Preaching the Gospel with a Passion for Particular People

A moving anecdote on why a great preacher repeated half his sermon on one early Sunday morning.

Misconceptions about Justification and Sanctification (Rick Phillips)

I have benefited from reading the comments on the wide
variety of blogs that have picked up the discussion between Tullian Tchividjian
and me on the subject of total depravity, the Christian, and the doctrine of
sanctification.  In some respects, …

Latest Office Hours! Hebrews 3:1-6 with Prof. Joel Kim

The Season 4 series of Office Hours entitled “Jesus is Really Better” continues.

Griffith John – Greatest Welsh Missionary Ever? (Paul Levy)

I was brought up in Ebenezer Baptist Church, Swansea and the great son of that church is Griffith John (not Steve Levy). Gary Brady points to a report on the BBC about him. The church has recently commemorated his death and John Aaron gives a terrific …

Parent as Counselor

Last year we interviewed CCEF counselor Julie Lowe to ask her questions about counseling children. We learned that ministry to children can and must look different than it does with adults. We asked Julie how transformation and growth in a child’s life looks different than it does in the lives of adults. Here is what she told us:

“The more I counsel children the more I realize that parents have to be part of the process. Transformation must happen in the context of the family. Adults can make changes for themselves, but children are dependent on their parents and on the choices people are making around them. Therefore, the key to working with children is working with parents. They are always part of the solution.

Whenever I can have parental involvement, I want it. My goal is for the parent to be the child’s wise counselor. I want the parents to do what I’m doing with their children. I equip parents to help their kids in the moment they’re struggling. When children are in my office, they are usually not struggling at that moment; they struggle at home or at school. I’m not there when it happens, but parents often are, so it’s much better to equip parents to help their children in those moments. Just as I seek to be an expert of each child I counsel, I encourage parents to do the same. You want to get to know the child—her temperament, strengths, weaknesses, and areas she’s prone to fall into sin and struggle.
 

You do not have to be a professional counselor to connect with children at their level. I regularly tell that to parents and families so that they are encouraged to be an agent of change and help in a child’s life.” 
 
Read the entire interview with Julie here.
 
For more resources on parenting, listen to Julie’s latest talk from our 2012 National Conference.

Lauren Whitman is a content curator at CCEF. Lauren is also a counselor and an editor for the Journal of Biblical Counseling.

 
off