The Power of Biblical Thinking (Nick Batzig)

Somewhat surprisingly, there has been a resurgence of interest in Norman Vincent Peale's power of positive thinking in our day. The Reformed Church in America minister--famous for giving people a panacea to protect themselves from all undesirable thoughts and actions--carved out a place for himself in American psychology and religion from the mid to late-twentieth century. President Trump has gone so far as to praise Peale for helping him embrace the idea of self-worth. In the newest season of Marvel's Jessica Jones, a character reads Peal's The Power of Positive Thinking while riding the public transport through a sketchy borough of the city. Ironically, this scene, full of sanguinity, fails to meet the criteria of what we might otherwise consider to be film noir. Nevertheless, the idea that you have the ability to think and speak away everything undesirable seems to have made a renewed headway in our culture.Every week, I stumble across memes and posts on social media in which someone expresses to someone else the idea that they are "wonderful," "beautiful," "special," and "loved" (oftentimes, with the adverb "so" prefixed to the verb "loved"). When I read such sentiments, my mind immediately turns to the SNL sketch in which Stuart Smalley gives himself daily affirmations: "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough and doggonit, people like me." Joking aside, there is a draw to positive thoughts and words. No one enjoys being around a curmudgeon. No one likes living with fears and discouragement. All of us find it refreshing to spend time with optimists. There is enough misery, sorrow, sadness and suffering all around us. It is certainly a whole lot more enjoyable to spend time with positive people. Furthermore, there is something supremely biblical about thinking right thoughts. The Apostle Paul told the believers in Philippi, "Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known t...

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